Tag Archives: Tim Wallach

1987 Fleer/Fleer Glossy #5

Bryn Smith had a couple of down years between 1986 and 1987. He had been a pitcher who consistently stayed above a 100 ERA+, but he fell to 95 in 86 and 97 in 87.

Jay Tibbs had a particularly ugly shot here. I had to do a lot of cleaning to try to be able to see him, and as you can tell, I still wasn’t very successful. This is why you don’t take shots with that kind of shadow in the background. Terrible lighting; how did this make it past Fleer QA?

Tim Wallach is pretty damn awesome. I had respect for him when he was an everyday player, and now as an Expos collector, I have even more respect for him. He may not have been a superstar, but he was a steady presence that offered good offense and defense at third base for years.

Mitch Webster was considered a pretty big deal for the early years of his career. I guess for good reason. He OPS+ed 132 upon joining the Expos in 85, then continued to hit pretty well. Hell, he hit well for most of his career. I was surprised to see that, considering how “eh” he seemed back in the day.

Jim Wohlford was a part-time player for all of his career, and 1986 was his final year in the league. He had a 96 OPS+, 1 homer, and not a whole lot else to recommend him.

Floyd Youmans is the last of our set. Floyd looked like a budding star in 1986, when he went 13-12 with a 3.53 ERA. Of course, he also led the league in walks. Hmmm. He got it together after that, but his career wasn’t long for the world. He had an alcoholism problem, and was suspended for the majority of 1988 after failing a drug test. He was done after a mediocre year in 1989, though he tried to come back twice. In 1990, the Philadelphia Inquirer wrote,  “Floyd Youmans, the once-promising pitcher who has been beleaguered by personal problems since 1987, said yesterday that the trauma in his life had become consuming. “Things in your private life have to be in order before you can be a pitcher,”Youmans said. “I need time off, but I can’t afford time off. Right now, baseball is not my number-one priority.”

Sad story. We’ll look at the 87 update soon.

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1989 Upper Deck #6

Man, team sets sure were bigger back in the day! Last entry.

Can’t go wrong with a Tim Raines card, even if the shot is not particularly interesting. Or maybe it is? What is he looking at? Is he just coming back in from the field? I love Tim and yet his 89 Upper Deck is a huge disappointment.

This should be another boring shot, but at least it has someone in the background and puts you back in Spring Training. It sure as hell beats the Raines card. 1988 was Rivera’s last year with the Expos, and he was…adequate, I suppose. Looking at his numbers it suddenly makes a little more sense as to why the team dealt for Spike Owen. Rivera wasn’t even that good with the glove.

I’ve spoken quite a bit about Nelson recently, learning a lot more about his career in the process. Now we get a shot of him at the old Vet with Steve Jeltz in the background. This is one of the great cards where you can pinpoint exactly when the shot was taken: September 25th, 1988, when the Expos played at the Phillies. In fact, it was the top of the 2nd inning, after Dennis Martinez hit a single and got Nelson to second base, where Jeltz was playing shortstop. How cool is that?

Yet another one of these shots. Mehhhhh.

Okay so that’s a Mets uniform, right? I’m torn between it being a Mets uniform or a Cubs uniform. I strongly suspect the Mets given the stadium in the background. It would also be a damn cool photo if so, which would mean that’s Gary Carter behind the plate (and it kind of looks like him), and the old teammates are chatting before Wallach steps up. I can quite easily imagine that’s what’s going on here from Wallach’s expression. Adds some gravitas to a card that I always kind of liked. In fact, I’m coming to appreciate Wallach a lot more the more I collect the Expos.

Last card of the set! Is that Veterans in the background? Of the away stadiums that Youmans pitched in in 1988, I’m thinking that’s the most likely stadium background there. If that’s the case, this would have been his June 15th appearance, when he took the loss. He only had more start left in his Expos career, so it’s kind of an important shot in his career.

So, let’s rate this set…

Design: 9/10 – I love the design, but of course it does have its issues. I don’t know if there’s a perfect design out there, but I love the 89 design. The baseline motif is very clever, and it provides some unusual colors (green and brown) to go with the generic white. I didn’t cover the backs here, but they’re truly my favorite part about the 89 set. Yeah, not full stats, but those larger pics on the back are well worth it.

Player Choice: 10/10 – Nothing to complain about here. Covers every single player that meant anything to the team in 88.

Photography: 6/10 – Some amazing shots mixed in with some very boring shots. Unfortunately the boring shots predominate in this team set, but I think overall the 89 UD set has some great pics.

Total: 8/10 – Good selection, good design, and you can’t deny what this set did for baseball. I feel fortunate to have this team set.

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Oddball Parade

Thought I’d show some of my oddballs…

1989 OPC Sticker

1989 OPC Sticker

1999 Private Stock Mini

1999 Private Stock Mini

1993 Diamond Marks

1993 Diamond Marks

2003 Bazooka Joe

2003 Bazooka Joe

1993 Diamond Marks

1993 Diamond Marks

  1995 Signature Rookies

1995 Signature Rookies

Panini Sticker

Panini Sticker

1994 Tombstone

1994 Tombstone

1986 Leaf

1986 Leaf

1989 Toys R Us Rookies

1989 Toys R Us Rookies

1989 K-mart

1989 K-mart

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1982 Fleer #7

Scott

1982 Fleer #207
Category:
2B/SS
Position: Expos Also-Ran
Bio/Summary: Poor Rodney Scott. It’s not enough that the guy had a career 71 OPS, he also didn’t even get put on his own card. 1982 was horrific; he had a 32 OPS+ with Montreal and got released then picked up by New York. It was his last year in the majors.
Rating: 7/10 – Hah, I wasn’t sure what to give this card. That sure isn’t Rodney Scott, but it’s a damn cool shot of Tim Raines in the on-deck circle. So I give it props for the great photo.
Sosa
1982 Fleer #208
Category:
Expos Lynchpin
Position: RP
Bio/Summary: I was all ready to write Elias off as a nobody for the Expos, but his numbers belie that assumption…sort of. He had some not-so-stellar WHIPs, which can be the kiss of death for a reliever. 1981 was Sosa’s last year in Montreal, and it was his worst, a sign that his career was on the downswing. He had a 95 ERA+ and a 1.373 WHIP. He was dealt to the Tigers in the offseason, and finished up his career with the Padres in 1983.
Rating: 6/10 – That Sunoco sign in the background is boss. Where is this, Philly? I like that you can see the sky above the roof; those things save an otherwise awful, out-of-focus, dark shot.
Speier
1982 Fleer #209
Category:
Former Expo
Position: IF
Bio/Summary: I remember Speier from his time with San Francisco in the late 80s. In 1982 he was a light-hitting infielder with the Expos, knocking an 88 OPS+ in 156 games.  I remember that he had a pretty decent glove, so that wasn’t bad at all…but having a guy like that in your lineup every day certainly doesn’t indicate a playoff-caliber team.
Rating: 8/10 – Another awesome on-deck shot. We need more of these.
Wallach
 
1982 Fleer #210
Category:
Expos Star
Position: 3B
Bio/Summary: Early Wallach! I didn’t even know he was in this set before coming across this card. 1982 was Wallach’s first full year as an Expo (he had auditions in 80 and 81), and he didn’t fail to produce, hitting 28 home runs and knocking in 81 runs with a 115 OPS+. Of course, he would go on to bigger and better things for the Expos.
Rating: 4/10 – Looks like the same location as the Sosa shot, but much more boring.
White
1982 Fleer #211
Category:
Former Expo
Position: OF
Bio/Summary: Jerry was another one of those light-hitting outfielders that plagued the Expos in the 80s. In 1982 he posted an absymal .243/.304/.365 line, and only lasted one more year as an Expo.
Rating: 7/10 – Ah hah! Suspicions confirmed. See that Phillies player in the background? Definitely old Veterans Stadium, then. Wish I could tell whose arm that is over his shoulder, but #32 should be Tom Gorman, who didn’t make this set. *frown face*

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1990 Bowman #5

Sampen

1990 Bowman #104
Category:
Failed Prospect
Position: P
Bio/Summary: Oh man will I be glad to never see this guy again. For a guy who didn’t have much of a career, he sure had a lot of cards in 1990, thanks to that 122 ERA+. I just don’t have much else to say about him.
Rating: 3/10 – Boring subject, boring photo.
Schmidt
1990 Bowman #110
Category:
Expos Also-Ran
Position: P
Bio/Summary: Dave Schmidt never really struck me as a very important guy in the grand scheme of things. Imagine my surprise when I looked and saw that he was above a 100 ERA+ from 1981 to 1988. Yeah, ERA+ isn’t a great stat for a reliever, but given what I thought of him, its a lot better than I thought. Of course, 1990 was a pretty lousy year for him (covered elsewhere, I believe), and he never produced for the Expos.
Rating: 2/10 – Blah.
Walker
 
1990 Bowman  #117
Category:
Expos Star
Position: OF
Bio/Summary: I don’t care what anyone else says: Larry Walker is awesome. He was part of that great little trio that included Deshields and Grissom back in 90, and I loved getting just about any card of him. I could go on and on about his career, but this is a 1990 card. He had a 112 OPS+, pretty good for a rookie, with a .241/.326/.434 line and 19 homers.
Rating: 4/10 – Man, this set had the market cornered on sweaty players. And I’m glad Walker’s mustache didn’t stay. Just look at that thing.
Wallach
 
Tim Wallach
1990 Bowman  #114
Category:
Expos Star
Position: 3B
Bio/Summary: Tim’s 1990 was excellent; he had an 810 OPS, with a 125 OPS+ and 21 homers. Nothing about his numbers pop out at you, so I think that’s why he was so consistently underrated.
Rating: 7/10 – How about that! An action shot, and you can see Tim’s face!
I’m pleased to end the set on that note…and just to end the set in general. Kind of a drab set, no? The only interesting thing about 1990 Bowman was the weird rookies they came up with. They would refine that approach over the years, but I didn’t understand their 1990 choices.

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